Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trial

The Synergistic Effects of AIH and FES in Persons With MS

Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine how neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), may synergistically enhance corticospinal excitability in people with relapsing form multiple sclerosis (MS). This is an important intermediate step to evaluate the potential of AIH + NMES as a plasticity-priming strategy for more efficacious interventions for persons with MS. This study will measure ankle torque generation and amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) using a repeated measures study design in order to better understand the effects of AIH combined with NMES, as compared to only receiving NMES, and only receiving AIH.

View Full Description

Full Description

NMES: NMES refers to the application of mild electrical stimulation and is often used as an assistive technology for foot drop in MS and other neurologic conditions. The NMES-induced improvement in motor performance appears to be mediated primarily by an increase in corticomotoneuronal excitability. A single session of NMES applied over a peripheral nerve, has been shown to transiently increase net corticospinal excitability (increased MEP amplitude) in both able-bodied individuals and in people with neurological conditions.

AIH: AIH involves breathing brief bouts of low levels of oxygen. Research has found AIH to be a safe and effective intervention resulting in increased ankle strength in people with MS. While AIH has shown potential in enhancing neuroplasticity in people with spinal cord injury (SCI), it has yet to be studied extensively in MS. Preliminary research in the MS population demonstrates that a single session of AIH enhances motor output, increasing voluntary muscle strength by as much as 15-20% within 60 minutes. Over the past decade, studies have found AIH can rapidly enhance neural plasticity in persons with incomplete SCI. AIH activates the serotonergic pathway, leading to increased activity of serotonin receptors and the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. This plasticity is manifested by a rapid increase in voluntary muscle strength, emerging within 60-90 minutes.

In this study, we will examine how NMES, which has been shown to affect cortical excitability, and AIH, which has been shown to affect corticospinal plasticity, may synergistically enhance corticospinal excitability in people with relapsing form of MS. Foot drop is a common symptom in the diagnosis of MS where the inability to maintain active dorsiflexion during the swing phase of the gait cycle affects walking efficiency, instability, and falls. Seminal studies show that individuals with MS retain the ability to express plasticity even at higher levels of disease burden. This indicates that strategies targeting neuroplasticity can be used to enhance functional recovery and limit the impact of MS disability. We will conduct a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 20 MS patients with established motor deficits and controlled relapse activity.

View Eligibility Criteria

Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Diagnosis of relapsing form of MS
Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of at least 3 and no more than 6.5
Motor Functional Systems Score (FSS) between 2-4
Relapse free for at least 1 year
Age ≥18 years and ≤75 years
Safe to participate in MRI (as indicated via the SRALab MRI questionnaire)
No change in Dalfampridine dose at least 2 months prior to enrollment

Exclusion Criteria:

Uncontrolled hypertension or hypotension (outside 140/90 and 90/60 mmHg)
History of epilepsy or seizures
Uncontrolled medical problems affecting the lungs (pulmonary diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), the heart (cardiovascular diseases) or the musculoskeletal system (orthopedic diseases)
Premorbid, ongoing major depression or psychosis, altered cognitive status
History of stroke
Metal in head (e.g., surgical clips, shrapnel)
Receiving drugs acting primarily on the central nervous system, which lower the seizure threshold such as antipsychotic drugs (chlorpromazine, clozapine) or tricyclic antidepressants
Surgery to the head
Any non-MS related neurological diseases
Illnesses that may have caused brain injury
Unexplained frequent or severe headaches
Pregnancy in females
Implanted devices (e.g., pacemakers, medical pumps, brain stimulators)

Study is for people with:

Multiple Sclerosis

Estimated Enrollment:

20

Study ID:

NCT06413602

Recruitment Status:

Not yet recruiting

Sponsor:

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

Check Your Eligibility

Let’s see if you might be eligible for this study.

What is your age and gender ?

Submit

There is 1 Location for this study

See Locations Near You

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
Chicago Illinois, 60611, United States

How clear is this clinincal trial information?

Study is for people with:

Multiple Sclerosis

Estimated Enrollment:

20

Study ID:

NCT06413602

Recruitment Status:

Not yet recruiting

Sponsor:


Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

How clear is this clinincal trial information?

×

Introducing, the Journey Bar

Use this bar to access information about the steps in your cancer journey.

Please confirm you are a US based health care provider:

Yes, I am a health care Provider No, I am not a health care provider