Prostate Cancer Clinical Trial

Technology Based Psychosocial Intervention for Symptom Management and HRQOL in Men Living With Advanced Prostate Cancer

Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of various factors such as emotions, stress, stress management techniques (for example relaxation and coping techniques), and health information on quality of life, distress, depression, coping, and physical health in men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer. We also evaluate the effectiveness of a 10-week group-based internet delivered psychosocial intervention. Primary outcomes are symptom burden (e.g., urinary function, fatigue, pain) and HRQOL (e.g., general, physical & social functioning).

Participation in this study includes three face-to-face assessments: baseline (at the beginning of the research study), 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up. The 6- and 12-month follow-up interviews are conducted after the participant has completed the 10-week group intervention. Participants are randomized into either an intervention group (targets stress management skills - relaxation, coping) or a control group (health information and health promotion strategies - benefits of proper nutrition and treatment compliance). Both groups meet for 10 consecutive weeks through an internet video conferencing platform.

At the baseline, 6- and 12-month follow-ups, we collect blood and saliva samples. The blood samples go through a three-day process in which we extract and store serum, plasma, and cells for further analysis and gather proliferation data. We use the saliva to measure the cortisol diurnal rhythm.

View Full Description

Full Description

This 5-year study evaluates the effects of a 10-week technology-based and delivered cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention (T-CBSM) on symptom burden in men with advanced prostate cancer (APC) undergoing hormonal therapy (HT), or HT with prior radiotherapy (RT) and/or radical prostatectomy (RP). APC is chronic and debilitating with survival rates about 32% and even lower rates for ethnic minorities. Most (70%) men diagnosed with APC receive HT to control progression. HT is associated with side effects including depression, fatigue, hot flashes, and sexual and urinary dysfunction, while RT and RP also lead to fatigue, irritation, urinary dysfunction, etc. Symptoms combined with challenges of living with advanced disease (e.g., unpredictable disease course) significantly deteriorate health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Yet, there is limited information on how psychosocial factors impact symptom burden, or on the efficacy of psychosocial interventions in reducing symptom burden and improving HRQOL. Furthermore, psychosocial modulation of endocrine and immune function is associated with symptoms and HRQOL in cancer patients, including those with advanced disease. Stress-related disruption in diurnal cortisol can promote inflammation that can exacerbate symptoms (e.g., fatigue, depression, pain). In the investigaros' pilot work, the investigators observed that audio-based T-CBSM improves social and physical functioning, and decreases symptom burden in APC. Moreover, targets of T-CBSM (e.g., coping skills) explain reductions in symptoms, whereas decreases in inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-6) and enhanced cortisol regulation are associated with decreases in symptoms such as depression, pain, urinary dysfunction and fatigue. The investigators propose to deliver an enhanced T-CBSM intervention to (a) capitalize on new technology using a video-conferencing for hard-to-reach and ethnically diverse patients, (b) incorporate a neuroimmune model of symptom regulation and management, and (c) test the efficacy of Web-CBSM in a multi-ethnic sample of 200 men living with APC. Men will be randomized to a T-CBSM group intervention or a health promotion group (T-HP) control condition. The investigators' primary aims are to determine the extent to which randomization to T-CBSM relative to T-HP is associated with: (Aim 1) improved symptom burden management and HRQOL, (Aim 2) reduced distress and interpersonal disruption, and improved stress management skills, and (Aim 3) improved neuroimmune regulation (i.e., normalized diurnal cortisol & decreases in inflammatory cytokines). The investigators will also test (Aim 4) a set of hypothesized pathways (e.g., T-CBSM driven changes in distress, stress management skills, neuroimmune regulation, etc.) that explain the association between group assignment and the primary outcomes of symptom burden and HRQOL. This is a 2x3 randomized experimental design with condition (T-CBSM vs. T-HP) as the between groups factor and time (baseline [T1], 6-mos. post-baseline [T2], & 12-mos. post-baseline [T3]) as the within groups factor.

Experimental Design. This is a randomized experimental trial designed to evaluate the effects of a 10-week technology-based group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention vs. a health promotion group-based attention matched control condition. Primary outcomes are symptom burden (e.g., urinary function, fatigue, pain) and HRQOL (e.g., general, physical & social functioning).

Participants. Participants will be 200 ethnically diverse men ages 50 or older, with stage III or IV prostate cancer (i.e., APC) who are on hormonal treatment (HT; androgen ablation, androgen deprivation, chemical castration) with or without radiotherapy (RT). Participants must also have undergone HT within the past 12 months.

View Eligibility Criteria

Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

≥ 50 years of age
Fluent in spoken English (6th grade level required to complete assessments and participate in groups)
Diagnosis of Stage III or IV (T3/N1/ M0-T4/N3/M1) prostate cancer
Received HT, or HT and RT treatment within the past year or is currently receiving HT, or HT and RT
Some patients with prior inpatient psychiatric treatment for severe mental illness or overt signs of severe psychopathology (e.g., psychosis) may be enrolled, per P.I. discretion, based on a case-by-case review
Willingness to be randomized and followed for 12 months

Exclusion Criteria:

Received treatment for a type of cancer other than prostate or skin cancer within the past 5 years or is currently receiving treatment for a cancer other than prostate or skin
Prior inpatient psychiatric treatment for severe mental illness or overt signs of severe psychopathology (e.g., psychosis), as these conditions can interfere with adequate participation in our experimental conditions may be exclusionary, per P.I. discretion, based on a case-by-case review
Active alcohol abuse or dependence OR inpatient treatment for alcohol abuse within the last 6 months may be exclusionary, per P.I. discretion
Active substance abuse or dependence OR inpatient treatment for substance abuse within the last 6 months may be exclusionary, per P.I. discretion
Acute or chronic immune system medical conditions, medications or other conditions that impact immune and endocrine function (e.g., CFS, Lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's disease, SLE, Hepatitis C, or any immunosuppressive treatment requiring conditions)
Life expectancy <12 months.

Study is for people with:

Prostate Cancer

Estimated Enrollment:

224

Study ID:

NCT03149185

Recruitment Status:

Completed

Sponsor:

Northwestern University

Check Your Eligibility

Let’s see if you might be eligible for this study.

What is your age and gender ?

Submit

There is 1 Location for this study

See Locations Near You

Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
Chicago Illinois, , United States
Rush University Medical Center
Chicago Illinois, , United States

How clear is this clinincal trial information?

Study is for people with:

Prostate Cancer

Estimated Enrollment:

224

Study ID:

NCT03149185

Recruitment Status:

Completed

Sponsor:


Northwestern University

How clear is this clinincal trial information?

×

Introducing, the Journey Bar

Use this bar to access information about the steps in your cancer journey.

Please confirm you are a US based health care provider:

Yes, I am a health care Provider No, I am not a health care provider