Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trial

Intermittent Hypoxia in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis

Summary

This study aims to understand the mechanisms of a novel intervention involving breathing short durations of low levels of oxygen for persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). This intervention with low levels of oxygen is called Acute Intermittent Hypoxia (AIH), the levels of oxygen experienced are similar to breathing the air on a tall mountain, for less than 1 minute at a time. Previous studies have shown that AIH is a safe and effective way to increase strength in persons with MS. Here we aim to look at brain activation and ankle strength before and after AIH so we can gain a better understanding of how the AIH may improve strength in those persons with MS.

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Full Description

Recent research has shown that AIH, characterized by brief episodes of reduced oxygen levels in the inspired air, has the potential to induce neural adaptations. These adaptations are suspected to influence several aspects of neuroplasticity, including the modulation of neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors. Persons with MS typically exhibit greater cortical activation to achieve a given motor task compared to healthy controls, suggesting compensatory activations in motor cortices and the recruitment of additional non-motor regions for successful motor control. Therefore, interventions that promote adaptive neuroplasticity in motor control systems may induce a reduction in fMRI activation during motor tasks as well as an increase in functional connectivity between somatomotor cortices. This study will explore potential mechanisms of this intervention in MS using motor task performance and advanced neuroimaging techniques.

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Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Diagnoses of relapsing form of MS (including relapsing-remitting MS and secondary-progressive MS)
Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of at least 3 and no more than 6.5
Motor Functional System Scale (FSS) between 2-4
Relapse free for at least 1 year
Age ≥ 18 years and ≤ 75 years
Safe to be scanned based on MRI questionnaire
Participants using dalfampridine will be eligible if taking the same daily dose for at least 2 months prior to screening

Exclusion Criteria:

Active contrast-enhancing MS lesions, or diffusion positive lesions suggestive of acute cerebrovascular disease on baseline MRI scan
Uncontrolled hypertension (Systolic between 85 and 140, diastolic between 90 and 55)
History of epilepsy
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Uncontrolled Sleep apnea
Pregnancy

Study is for people with:

Multiple Sclerosis

Estimated Enrollment:

21

Study ID:

NCT06276634

Recruitment Status:

Not yet recruiting

Sponsor:

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

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There is 1 Location for this study

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Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
Chicago Illinois, 60611, United States More Info
Alexander Barry, MS, CCRC
Contact
312-238-1435
[email protected]
Milap Sandhu, PT, PhD
Principal Investigator
Molly Bright, D.Phil.
Sub-Investigator

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Study is for people with:

Multiple Sclerosis

Estimated Enrollment:

21

Study ID:

NCT06276634

Recruitment Status:

Not yet recruiting

Sponsor:


Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

How clear is this clinincal trial information?

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