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SurvivorNet Fact Checking and Medical Review Standards:  

The SurvivorNet News Team creates high quality medical information that complies with our industry leading standards for factual accuracy and sourcing from leading experts at academic medical institutions. Every news article is thoroughly fact-checked by our physician collaborators. We vet each piece of work for factual integrity, impartiality, and clearly label any professional conflicts.

All SurvivorNet articles adhere to the following standards:

  1. All studies and research papers cited are from reputable academic medical institutions or peer-reviewed journals.
  2. When we use data, statistics, or quotes these references link to the original source.
  3. All content related to new treatments, drugs, procedures, and so on must clearly describe availability, side effects, treatment target (such as triple negative breast cancer)
  4. All medical information on SurvivorNet is sourced from respected medical professionals with verified medical credentials and links are provided to these sources.
  5. We strive to give the reader relevant background information and include, clearly-sourced contextual health information in all articles. Readers are clearly alerted to any conflicts of interest from a medical source or the authors of a cited study.
/ Updated May 13th, 2021

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Can Radiation Scans Cause Cancer?

PET and CT scans expose patients to only small amounts of radiation, and doctors say the risk is low.

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Living With Cancer: Life After Treatment

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  • The type of disease & the treatment will determine what life is like after treatment
  • Patients should create a survivorship plan, which includes follow-up visits with doctors and scans for long-term health effects
  • Your care team can provide diet & exercise recommendations as part of the survivorship plan

Living With Cancer: Life After Treatment

  • The type of disease & the treatment will determine what life is like after treatment
  • Patients should create a survivorship plan, which includes follow-up visits with doctors and scans for long-term health effects
  • Your care team can provide diet & exercise recommendations as part of the survivorship plan

Living With Cancer: Diet & Exercise

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  • Diet, exercise & stress control are really important when going through cancer treatment and recovery
  • There’s no data to support any one specific diet (like keto or sugar-free) will help during treatment
  • Experts simply recommend getting enough nutrients, staying active if you can and keeping mental health in check

Living With Cancer: Diet & Exercise

  • Diet, exercise & stress control are really important when going through cancer treatment and recovery
  • There’s no data to support any one specific diet (like keto or sugar-free) will help during treatment
  • Experts simply recommend getting enough nutrients, staying active if you can and keeping mental health in check

Living With Cancer: Follicular Lymphoma

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  • Follicular lymphoma is the most common type of slow-growing (or indolent) lymphoma
  • The disease can be so slow-growing that patients do not need treatment
  • Instead of treatment, doctors may suggest “watchful waiting” to monitor the disease and make sure it stays slow-growing

Living With Cancer: Follicular Lymphoma

  • Follicular lymphoma is the most common type of slow-growing (or indolent) lymphoma
  • The disease can be so slow-growing that patients do not need treatment
  • Instead of treatment, doctors may suggest “watchful waiting” to monitor the disease and make sure it stays slow-growing

Living With Cancer: Monitoring After a Diagnosis

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  • If your doctor suspects there may have been a change to your cancer, they may order a PET or CT scan
  • Some patients are concerned that radiation they are exposed to during scans could have harmful effects
  • The amount of radiation patients are exposed to during these scans is very small, and the body is generally able to tolerate it well

Living With Cancer: Monitoring After a Diagnosis

  • If your doctor suspects there may have been a change to your cancer, they may order a PET or CT scan
  • Some patients are concerned that radiation they are exposed to during scans could have harmful effects
  • The amount of radiation patients are exposed to during these scans is very small, and the body is generally able to tolerate it well
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