Updated March 14th, 2022

Lung Screening With Low-Dose CT Should Happen For All

A new study finds that lung cancer mortality was 24 percent lower in men and 33 percent lower in women who had a low-dose CT test, compared to a traditional X-Ray.

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Prevention & Screening: Screening Saves Lives

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  • People who are at high risk for lung cancer because of their smoking history should be screened annually with a low-dose CT scan.
  • This screening should begin at age 50 regardless of whether the person has symptoms.
  • High risk includes people with a 20 pack-year smoking history who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.

Prevention & Screening: Screening Saves Lives

  • People who are at high risk for lung cancer because of their smoking history should be screened annually with a low-dose CT scan.
  • This screening should begin at age 50 regardless of whether the person has symptoms.
  • High risk includes people with a 20 pack-year smoking history who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.
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