Genetics & Biologic Differences are Partially to Blame for Higher Breast Cancer Death Rates Among African American Women

Updated April 9th, 2021

Genetics & Biologic Differences are Partially to Blame for Higher Breast Cancer Death Rates Among African American Women

African American women seem to develop breast cancer earlier than white women. And it's often more aggressive, too. Genetic differences in women of different races, and biological differences in tumors, may drive these worse outcomes.

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